Moons are always smaller than planets – Why ? Explained

Moons – also known as natural satellites – orbit planets and asteroids in our solar system. Most of the major planets – all except Mercury and Venus – have moons. Pluto and some other dwarf planets, as well as many asteroids, also have small moons. Earth has one moon. Saturn and Jupiter have the most moon, with dozens orbiting each of the two giant planets. These moons are always smaller than planets that they orbit (move around).

Moons are always smaller than planets. But Why ?

A smaller body always orbits around a larger body rather than the other way around because the larger body has more gravity. Hence, a moons are always smaller than planets that they orbit (move around).

Moons are always smaller than planets because a smaller body always orbits around a larger body because the larger body has more gravity.
Moons are always smaller than planets because the planet more gravity. Image Credit: Wikipedia

However, not all of the moons are smaller than all of the planets. There are seven moons in our Solar System, including our own Moon, that are larger than Pluto. Jupiter’s moon Ganymede is the largest moon in the Solar System, and Ganymede as well as Saturn’s moon Titan are both larger than Mercury and Pluto. Earth’s Moon, Jupiter’s moons Callisto, Io, and Europa, and Neptune’s moon Triton are all larger than Pluto, but smaller than Mercury.

Why moons don’t have their own submoons while smaller objects like asteroids can have moons?

The moons of bigger planet like Jupiter and Saturn and even Earth don’t have their own submoons because Jupiter/Saturn/Earth’s etc. gravitational tidal forces being superior to that of the moons on each celestial body. Hence, these potential submmons either start orbiting around the planet or may fall into it.

See Also:

Reference:

guest
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments